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The rule of threes when adopting a pet

Our primary goal as a humane society is to find homes for the hundreds of homeless companion animals we care for each year. Our wish for all of them is a long, wonderful life in a loving home.
Zelda

Our primary goal as a humane society is to find homes for the hundreds of homeless companion animals we care for each year. Our wish for all of them is a long, wonderful life in a loving home. Sometimes getting there may require a little bit of help in setting realistic expectations for what bringing a new pet home will be like. It takes time to adjust to a new living situation and sometimes shelter animals require a bit more time, so when adopting we would ask that you try and put yourself in their paws. Imagine that you’re an animal just living your life, whether it is with a family or as a stray. You probably have a routine, either set by your caregivers or you may be footloose and fancy free. Suddenly, you are placed in a foreign space. This place is noisy, it has different smells, you are inside most of the time and everything is new. It might be scary but you are resilient and soon this becomes the new normal. You settle into your new routine; the people are nice, food comes on a regular basis, you get cuddles or walks and you adjust. Then things change again. You’re taken out of this place by some very nice people and taken to a new place. What’s going to happen here? There may be other animals that you have to share space with or are around when you eat. Are they going to take your food? You now walk in new areas, sleep in different places, and eat different food. What if you don't know the language and can't communicate to tell them how worried you are? How quickly would you adjust? Change is scary. Think about the changes that happen in your life. The feeling of being in an unfamiliar place, new people, new rules, new home, a change in diet. Now think about it if all happened in the same day. How would you feel? Most shelter pets need time and patience to fit into a new home. There is something called the 3-3-3 Rule. In the first three days, your new pet may be overwhelmed with his new surroundings. He may not eat, or be himself. After three weeks, he’s starting to settle in, feeling more comfortable, and realizing this just might be his home. He lets his guard down and may start showing his real personality for good or not so good. After three months your pet is now comfortable in his home. You have built trust and a true bond. At the CAHS we want every adoption to be the start of a lifelong relationship; it brings us so much joy to hear tales of happy endings for the animals we love. Our adoption specialists provide advice and resources on how to introduce your adopted pet to their new home and to their new family. Allow us to get you off on the right foot, you might just find your soul mate!