Skip to content

Editorial: Election 2021

When the dust on the federal election finally settled on the late evening of Sept. 20, Canadians found themselves looking at a government that wasn't much different than the one before it.
cochrane-editorial

When the dust on the federal election finally settled on the evening of Sept. 20, Canadians found themselves with a government that wasn't much different than the one before it. Justin Trudeau is still prime minister, the Liberals still command a minority government, and the Conservatives are still the Official Opposition.

In terms of representation in the House of Commons, not a lot changed from when Parliament was dissolved on Aug. 15 to when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gave his victory speech on Monday night. While a few notable ridings changed colour here and there, the lack of difference was frankly quite anti-climactic.

Even though he will remain prime minister, one could argue the party leader who lost most this election was Trudeau. He gambled by calling the election in the first place, banking his then-popularity in the polls on the likelihood he could secure a majority government for the Liberals. In the end, Trudeau will have to settle for another minority, propped up by other parties.

Locally, voters in the Banff-Airdrie riding can also expect the status quo. Despite competition from eight other candidates, four-term incumbent Conservative MP Blake Richards easily re-claimed his seat with 58 per cent of the vote. The result was hardly ever in doubt, though it was interesting to see so many candidates put their hat in the ring for the Banff-Airdrie race this election.

It begs the question many people have been asking – was the election worth it? Many people will say no, arguing, like former MP Lisa Raitt said on CTV, that the $600 million election provided little more than a cabinet shuffle.

Others will argue the opposite, claiming the snap election not only gave Canadians the opportunity to have their say in who would form the next government, but it also provided temporary jobs and some economic stimulus.

Regardless how you feel, with another minority government, it's likely Canadians will be heading to the polls all over again a few years from now.